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Showing posts from April, 2012

Press Release: Last Call for Entries to the 62nd Palanca Awards

Aspiring writers still have time to finalize and submit their entries to the 62nd Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards for Literature (Palanca Awards).

The Palanca Awards, the Philippines' most prestigious and longest running literary competition, is accepting submissions until 12:00 m.n. of April 30, in the following regular categories:

English Division – Short Story, Short Story for Children, Essay, Poetry, Poetry for Children, One-act Play, and Full-length Play;

Filipino Division – Maikling Kuwento, Maikling Kuwentong Pambata, Sanaysay, Tula, Tulang Pambata, Dulang May Isang Yugto, Dulang Ganap ang Haba, and Dulang Pampelikula;

Regional Languages Division – Short Story-Cebuano, Short Story-Hiligaynon and Short Story-Iluko.

Young writers below 18 years old are encouraged to submit essays in the Kabataan Division. This year's theme for the Kabataan Essay is “In the advent of e-books, do I still consider printed books to be an important part of education?” The theme for the Kabataan Sana…

Press Release: A Treasure Trove of Asian Culture and Heritage

Singapore, 20 April 2012 – Dr Yaacob Ibrahim, Minister for Information, Communications and the Arts launched the National Library Board's (NLB) Asian Children's Literature Collection at the Woodlands Regional Library. This is the first time a library will be housing a comprehensive thematic collection.

Mrs Elaine Ng, Chief Executive Officer, NLB, said, “The Asian Children's Literature Collection will serve a range of users like researchers with scholarly needs, teachers assembling lesson materials, parents looking for bedtime reads for their children, and the young who love fascinating tales. We can use these fairy tales, folklores and fables to help our children understand our values, beliefs and customs.”

With the inclusion of this collection, Woodlands Regional Library has about 181,000 books and other materials in the children's section. Visitors can borrow from a selection of 7,200 books including Chinese, Malay, and Tamil books.

There are another 800 books for visit…

What's new for the Asian Festival of Children's Content?

Some exciting new things for the 2012 Asian Festival of Children's Content in Singapore:

This year the festival has a country focus, and the country to be highlighted is none other than the Philippines! If you have been curious about Philippine children's books, this year's festival will be the perfect opportunity to hear from and network with some Filipino writers, illustrators, and book reviewers. I'd most especially like to invite you to attend the two panels I am facilitating, "Trajectories and Themes in Children's Literature from the Philippines" and "The Art & Science of Writing Book Reviews: Online vs. Print." In "Trajectories and Themes," popular author-illustrators Russell Molina and Jomike Tejido will be sharing the special features of Philippine children's books and trends in the local market, while Candy Gourlay and Isabel Roxas will be sharing their success stories as internationally-recognized children's book …

A Little Taste of What's Discussed at the Asian Festival of Children's Content

Waiting On Wednesday: Never Fall Down by Patricia McCormick

Never Fall Downby Patricia McCormick (HarperCollins/Balzer + Bray, 8 May 2012)

Book description:
When soldiers arrive at his hometown in Cambodia, Arn is just a kid, dancing to rock 'n' roll, hustling for spare change, and selling ice cream with his brother. But after the soldiers march the entire population into the countryside, his life is changed forever. Arn is separated from his family and assigned to a labor camp: working in the rice paddies under a blazing sun, he sees the other children, weak from hunger, malaria, or sheer exhaustion, dying before his eyes. He sees prisoners marched to a nearby mango grove, never to return. And he learns to be invisible to the sadistic Khmer Rouge, who can give or take away life on a whim.

One day, the soldiers ask if any of the kids can play an instrument. Arn's never played a note in his life, but he volunteers. In order to survive, he must quickly master the strange revolutionary songs the soldiers demand—and steal food to keep the…

My heart is so full.

Now to make my bookshelves just as full. :o)

By the way, click here to see where I got the picture above. It goes with a nice little rant about how a lot of people forget the diversity in Asia.

Congratulations to the finalists of the 2012 Children's Choice Book Awards!

Especially to:

Shaun Tan


Lost and Found: Three (Arthur A. Levine Books, 2011), finalist for Fifth Grade to Sixth Grade Book of the Year

and Dan Santat


Sidekicks (Arthur A. Levine Books, 2011), finalist for Third Grade to Fourth Grade Book of the Year

Click here for more information about the Children's Choice Book Awards.

Whoa, there is another one.

Jeremy Lin: From the End of the Bench to Stardom by Bill Davis (Right Fit Reading, 2012)

My thoughts: It would be interesting if there would be a book on Jeremy Lin written by an Asian American. . .

Call for Papers: Growing Up Asian American in Children's Literature

Growing Up Asian American in Children's Literature, Proposed Edited Collection

“Growing Up Asian American in Children’s Literature” seeks to explore some of the major issues Asian American children and adolescents face growing up in the United States in the latter half of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first century. Part of the mission of the collection is to define the term Asian American inclusively, to include all the “Asian” ethnicities from the Asian continent, the Pacific Rim, and also from around the world. Some questions the collection will discuss are what does it mean to be Asian and American? Is there a loss of identity in assimilation? How are Asian American children’s experiences different from other minority groups? Are different regions of the country factors in how they grow up? How do they construct themselves racially and culturally?

The collection will be interdisciplinary and may include non-traditional texts, such as picture books, comic …

I have to agree with the fans who say. . .

That the movie adaptation of Avatar: The Last Airbender should have been a bit more like this:



Read: ASIAN (and Inuit!) people with elemental powers.

And yes, I'm bringing this up again because of those racist Hunger Games tweets, because Avatar: The Legend of Korra has started (Why do I get the sinking feeling there are still people out there who will deny the Asian and Inuit roots of the Avatar world?), and because I like that K-pop group in the video.